With all eyes on the economy, policymakers are quick to invoke the buzzwords of the day, such as “innovation”, “economic development”, and “job creation”, to describe the beneficial impact of commercializing early stage technology, often from research universities. Recently though, it seems that special interests, void of workable solutions, are grabbing headlines and helping to craft policy based on the suggestion that research universities are doing little to support this opportunity.

If you have accepted this information as fact, you would understandably think the system has neglected its duty, has failed, and is need of a revolutionary fix; however, with minimal investigation, you will see that universities have lead in the development of tactics and programs that address critical barriers to early stage commercialization, often ahead of other public and private entities.

One such example, is their development of gap funding programs to address the capital shortage that exists for early-stage technologies and start-ups.

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